Ginger.io raises $20M for passive, smartphone-based health tracking

By Aditi Pai
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ginger.ioSan Francisco-based health behavior monitoring and analytics startup Ginger.io raised $20 million, according to an SEC filing. This brings the company's total funding to at least $28.2 million.

It's likely that Kaiser Permanente Ventures invested in the round because Ginger.io added Kaiser Permanente Ventures partner Dave Schulte to its board in the filing, as pointed out in a report over at TechCrunch. Existing investors include Khosla Ventures, True Ventures, and Romulus Capital.

Ginger.io offers a smartphone app that passively collects data from users’ phones including information on their movement throughout the day, call patterns, and texting patterns. Users can also actively record information about how they are feeling each day. If the app senses that something is off with the user, it can automatically notify a third party, like the user’s family or a physician.

This technology can be used in the treatment of mental health conditions, but the behavior patterns Ginger.io tracks can also be used to monitor chronic conditions like heart disease. The company has announced a spate of pilots in the past year that include both these use cases. 

Last month, Ginger.io announced that it partnered with the Association for Utah Community Health (AUCH) to launch Utah SmartCare, a care management program that aims to improve patient engagement and health outcomes in low-income Utah populations. The program will focus on low-income patients living at or below 200 percent of federal poverty guidelines who are either Medicaid beneficiaries or uninsured.

And in November, the company announced several partners including UC San Francisco, Partners HealthCare (Massachusetts General Hospital, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, and McLean Hospital), Duke University, UC Davis, and University of Nebraska Medical Center.

Earlier in the year, Ginger.io teamed up with Verizon to pilot a mobile intervention for high-cost Medicaid patients. The pilot was run by Centerstone Research Institute.