Survey: 65 percent of millennials think fitness tracking is important

By Aditi Pai
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Some 65 percent of millennials think its important to track their fitness, according to a survey of 5,000 millennials, aged 14 to 34, commissioned by Technogym, a fitness equipment manufacturer. The survey was conducted by Loudhouse, a UK-based independent research agency.

The survey found that 72 percent of millennials said one benefit of tracking their fitness is that they could do it on the go, while 48 percent said it was helpful for keeping their fitness data organized in one place, and 43 percent said a benefit was more accurate data. Some 29 percent said the ease of sharing data with friends and families was a positive to using fitness trackers.

TechnogymThe survey also found that 44 percent of millennials think the traditional gym will evolve in the next five years and that gyms will be more interactive and customized to individual member's needs. When asked about where millennials expect to get information on health trends in two years,  38 percent said from a health blog, 32 percent said from friends and family, 31 percent said from health-focused apps, and 31 percent said from health magazines.

Last month, another survey conducted about millennials, this one from Nuance, found that they are more likely than baby boomers to crowdsource their choice of physician, both online and in-person with friends.

The survey found that 70 percent of patients aged 18 to 24 choose a primary care physician based on recommendations from family and friends, compared to just 41 percent of patients over the age of 65. When patients are unsatisfied with their care, different age groups use that information in different ways: 51 percent of patients 65 and older tell their doctors directly, while 60 percent of patients aged 18 to 24 tell their friends instead.