Common Sensing announces $6.6M to commercialize GoCap

By Dave Muoio
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Cambridge, Massachusetts-based Common Sensing, which specializes in connected containers for injectable medications, has raised $6.6 million in Series A funding. The round was led by Waterline Ventures, with New World Health, Royal Philips, and Haselmeier also participating.

The funding will be used to accelerate manufacturing and commercial operations for Common Sensing’s GoCap, a dose and adherence monitoring device for insulin, fertility medications, growth hormones, and other injectable medicines.

"When a person is prescribed insulin, that injection is the most important daily step they take to better health outcomes,” James White, cofounder and president of Common Sensing, said in a statement. “And yet, most care teams have no visibility into how their patients are using insulin and many patients are missing critical feedback about their care — Common Sensing closes this information gap for both patients and care teams with its new technology.”

GoCap records injectable dosage, timing, and storage to allows patients and providers to better manage self-care. The connected device’s data-driven approach allows it to support automatic refills, dose titration, pharmaceutical support, and remote disease management.

Recently, the device was tapped for a pilot program run by Sanofi and Innovation Health. A year prior, Common Sensing launched a clinical trial of the platform last October in collaboration with Joslin Diabetes Center, Sanofi, and Dexcom. The startup was also a participant of the Philips HealthWorks Startup Program.

"Waterline is extremely excited to work with the Common Sensing team. They are drastically improving care delivery for people using injectable medicine," Robbie Greenglass, partner at Waterline Ventures, said in a statement. "We invest in platform solutions that will drive the technological transformation of care delivery worldwide, and with over 16 billion injections delivered every year, Common Sensing is tackling a massive problem that has not had a solution available in the past."