Digital health news briefs for 4/26/2017

By Jonah Comstock
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DarioHealth launches in the UK. Israel-based DarioHealth, makers of a smartphone-connected glucometer, announced the launch of a direct-to-consumer channel in the United Kingdom. It is already available D2C in the US and Australia, but was previously available in the UK only through pharmacies and diabetes educators.

PlushCare launches telemedicine EMR. PlushCare, a D2C telemedicine service focused on urgent care, launched a new service called Lemur, which it bills as the first ever EMR for telemedicine. The cloud-based EMR streamlines physician workflows and consolidates data.

“Traditional EMRs available detract from the overall patient experience and greatly limit physicians’ ability to connect on a personal level with their patients,” Dr. James Wantuck, Chief Medical Officer and cofounder of PlushCare, said in a statement. “Lemur bridges the gap by lifting the technological burden off of physicians more than any other EMR by placing all necessary patient information at their fingertips, creating the most human way to visit the doctor.”

Ada Health officially launches. Ada, a personal health companion and telemedicine app from the London- and Berlin-based tech company of the same name, officially launched last week. The AI-powered app asks users questions and provides possible causes for their symptoms. For users in the UK, it can also connect them to a doctor if the app isn’t able to help. 

“We built Ada to bring personalized health information and care to all,” founder and Chief Medical Officer Dr. Claire Novorol said in a statement. “By helping patients to understand their symptoms and make informed decisions about what to do next, Ada can empower patients and make doctors' jobs a little bit easier. With the NHS and other health systems experiencing unprecedented strain, there is a pressing need for technologies like this."

ResApp expands SMARTCOUGH-C study. ResApp has been working on a major multi-site trial of its smartphone-based respiratory sensing technology. Last week the company announced that due to unseasonably low rates of pneumonia in the study group, it would extend the study through to the end of May and increase maximum recruitment to 1,500 patients.

“Seasonal variations have affected the incidence rate of key diseases observed during our SMARTCOUGH-C study and we need to adapt accordingly,” CEO Tony Keating said in a statement. “By increasing the total number of patients recruited we will improve the statistical power of our results and incorporate a wider range of respiratory diseases. This in turn will strengthen our FDA submission and support our goal of providing a complete differential diagnosis tool for respiratory disease.”