One Drop launches diabetes management app on Android, awaits FDA clearance for connected meter

By Heather Mack
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One Drop, the diabetes management app that debuted last year on iOS, is now available on Android.

One Drop offers a direct-to-consumer app for diabetes management that allows users with type 1, type 2 or pre-diabetes to log a variety of information: glucose, diet, activity and insulin. Users can share that information anonymously with a community of users, and the platform also offers users actionable insights based on their data. The Android launch is the next step towards One Drop’s full offering to come later this year – a connected blood glucose monitor called One Drop Chrome and a diabetes supply subscription services called One Drop Premium that will also include coaching.

“This is a steady drumbeat towards what we will be offering later this fall,” Jeff Dachis, One Drop’s CEO told MobiHealthNews in an interview. “We’re leading up to a place where we can offer everything you need to manage diabetes any where, with no hassle and no need for insurance. It just works.”

Dachis said the company submitted for FDA approval in July, and expects to hear back within the next few weeks. Once approved, One Drop will start shipping its Chrome Meter lancing device (featured on Indiegogo) with a subscription that includes test strips and coaching for around $30 to $40 per month.

The idea to create the platform was borne out of Dachis’ own diagnosis of type 1 diabetes three years ago.

“I was really baffled at how antiquated technology was in this marketplace,” he said. “Healthcare is still the last bastion of antiquated, bureaucratic complications while the rest of technology has enabled us to make our lifestyle so much easier, universally. So, we wondered, what if we had connected devices with mobile computing and big data in cloud to manage this like everything else? That is, in effect, what we’ve done.”

The One Drop App, which can integrate with Apple Health to sync data from other apps and devices including CGMs and Bluetooth-enabled meters, has been used by people in 190 countries, comprising over 85 million points of data. The app features English, Arabic and Chinese, and Spanish is soon to come.  

Dachis said the idea was to create a piece of technology that was sleek and stylish, that looked more like a part of some one’s life than the hassle of managing a disease.

“We wanted to make something beautiful…something you would be proud of, something that would bust the stigma of diabetes,” Dachis said. “Using it, you can engage with diabetes, and it should be that easy – you should love doing it because you finally have a gorgeous, connected device and a coach, at your fingertips.”