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By Brian Dolan August 26, 2009
Wireless sensing and communications developer CardioMEMS just announced that it had completed a $22.1 million round of financing. The company said that the additional funds will bankroll its heart failure clinical trial, which was initiated in September of 2007 and is currently taking place in more than 65 heart centers across the U.S. CardioMEMS first announced its heart failure pressure...
By Brian Dolan August 26, 2009
ATLANTA, Aug. 26 -- CardioMEMS, Inc., a medical technology company that has developed and is commercializing proprietary wireless sensing and communication technology for the human body, today announced the completion of a $22.1M financing. The financing provides the company with additional capital to fund the company's CHAMPION clinical trial. Initiated in September 2007, the CHAMPION trial is...
By Brian Dolan August 25, 2009
"The single fastest growing medical device we have in this country is probably the iPhone," Jon Linkous, CEO of the American Telemedicine Association told Mobihealthnews. "I have discussions about the iPhone every single day." Linkous also explained how the telemedicine industry has grown from "white labeled" (literally) corporate video conferencing solutions to the rapidly growing wireless...
By Brian Dolan August 25, 2009
Epocrates' fourth annual Future Physicians of America survey polled more than 1,000 medical students about their technology preferences and habits. Epocrates found that nearly 90 percent of medical students view information available through mobile or online drug and disease references, like Epocrates' own offerings, as "highly credible." Epocrates found that students are four times more likely...
By Brian Dolan August 25, 2009
Fourth Annual Survey by Epocrates Gives U.S. Medical Students Voice on Pressing Issues SAN MATEO, Calif. -- Medical students give the U.S. healthcare system a poor grade and consider technology a ‘must have' for their future practice. These opinions and technology priorities, including mobile reference and electronic medical records (EMRs), are represented in the fourth annual Future Physicians...
By Brian Dolan August 25, 2009
Matthew Connor, a rising junior at Princeton University received a $100,000 grant from Center for Integration of Medicine and Innovative Technology (CIMIT) to build a more in-depth online portal for his diabetes management iPhone app, Islet, which Connor and his brother launched last September. Islet enables diabetics to record what and how much they eat, their insulin injections, blood sugar...
By Brian Dolan August 24, 2009
If your smartphone has a compass built-in, a camera and GPS, then it may soon offer "augmented reality" applications, which overlay information onto the phone's screen while the camera is being pointed at a particular object or location. A Wikipedia article may pop up if the phone is pointed at the Washington Monument. A link to a person's Facebook page may appear when the phone's camera is...
By Brian Dolan August 24, 2009
By Bradley Merrill Thompson, Partner, Epstein Becker & Green, P.C. Last month I outlined the triggers that could cause an ordinary mobile phone to become an FDA-regulated medical mobile phone. This month, in the second of six planned articles, I will outline the FDA requirements that would apply to a mobile phone that crosses that line. To summarize the July 13 article on "FDA may regulate...
By Brian Dolan August 24, 2009
Diabetes app usage metrics: MYLEstone Health, developer of the Glucose Buddy iPhone app, has added a real-time tracking feature to its application for diabetes management. The service has clocked almost 400,000 user logs in the past 100 days. MYLEstone announced earlier this year that it had inked a deal with Roche Diagnostics' Accu-Chek to add its educational program to the Glucose Buddy...
By Brian Dolan August 22, 2009
Band-Aid-like painless patch with "microneedles": Researchers have designed Band-Aid-like "painless" patches that they hope will one day replace the procedure for getting a shot. The patches are lined with tiny "microneedles" that the researchers believe could change how we manage diabetes as well as a number of other diseases. The patches are supposedly "safer, more effective and less painful,"...

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