It's official: Intel, GE partner on mHealth

Looks like the Wall Street Journal's rumor mill piece was right: As we reported earlier this week, Intel and GE are planning to work together to market home-health monitoring solutions leveraging wireless sensors that aim to prevent falls, increase medication compliance and treat sleep apnea. The companies plan to invest $250 million over the next five years for research and development into this emerging market.

CardioNet to buy Biotel, enter clinical research

This morning wireless cardiac monitoring company CardioNet announced its intent to acquire Minnesota-based Biotel for $14 million. CardioNet is particulary interested in Biotel's Agility Centralized Research Services, which is based in Chicago, and provides ECG monitoring services to the medical device and pharma industries as well as to contract research and academic research organizations.

@CTIA Seidenberg to Scripps, mHealth bubbles up

"Very exciting," Verizon CEO Ivan Seidenberg said after describing a mobile clinical assistant tablet that Verizon Wireless recently approved in its Open Development Lab. Seidenberg's keynote here at the CTIA Wireless event in Las Vegas included a number of references to mHealth, including wirelessly connected blood glucose monitors.

Possible Intel, GE wireless sensor partnership?

According to a report in the Wall Street Journal, Intel and General Electric are planning to announce Thursday a joint venture that the companies are reportedly calling "health care reimagined." The partnership is expected to include applications for home health monitoring using wireless sensors.

The report highlights GE's QuietCare service, which uses wireless motion sensors in homes to track the daily activities of patients in need of remote monitoring. The sensors then transmit that to servers and computers used by a remote healthcare staff.

Where genomic research meets mHealth

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services sponsored a meeting in San Diego yesterday that aimed to map future funding and research opportunities for personalized health, including preventive, genomic-research based medicine and wireless monitoring applications and services. The session included representatives from Intel, Google, Qualcomm and Cisco Systems.

@CTIA: 1 Trillion text messages in 2008

This morning at the CTIA wireless event in Las Vegas, CTIA President Steve Largent announced the latest metrics for mobile phone usage in the U.S. The numbers only reaffirm the mobile platform as the best one for interactive health applications. Here's a quick rundown of the latest wireless stats for U.S. subscribers:

Subscribers: The total number of subscribers at the end of 2008 was more than 270 million, which is 15 million more than year-end 2007.

Google Health now viewable on iPhone

An iPhone application developer has leveraged Google Health's API to create Health Cloud, an application for Apple's iPhone that gives users access to the information they have entered into their Google Health personal health record. Like the other Google Health readers for mobile phones that we have written about in the past, this one only allows users to access the information in a readable format; Health Cloud does not allow you to update your Google Health record.

@mHI: The 12 clusters of mHealth

The mHealth Initiative Spring Seminar here in Boston kicked off today with about 30 attendees from various segments of the mobile health sector, including Google, Orlando Health, AllOne Mobile/Diversinet, Verizon Wireless and Nortel. The mHealth Initiative's President Claudia Tessier kicked off the event by explaining the difference between the mHI and her previous mobile health group, MoHCA.

MoHCA vs. mHI