allergies

By Dave Muoio September 13, 2017
Researchers at Harvard Medical School have built a point-of-use food allergen detector that fits onto a keychain and can conducts tests in under ten minutes. The prototype device costs less than $40 to produce, and in restaurant settings could detect major antigens at sensitivities well below the regulatory limit. While the sensitivity and ease of the integrated exogenous antigen testing (iEAT)...
By Jonah Comstock March 24, 2017
Sanofi Consumer Healthcare, a division of the global pharmaceutical company, used wearable devices in a "social experiment" that forms part of the marketing efforts for Xyzal, its 24-hour allergy medication that recently became available over the counter. The company used wearables to track the sleep and activity of allergy sufferers in a small non-scientific test in order to demonstrate ways in...
By Jonah Comstock June 4, 2014
A new smartphone-connected device for measuring the nutritional content of food has raised $2.2 million on Kickstarter, on top of $4 million to $5 million in funding from venture capitalists including Khosla Ventures, according to TechCrunch. SCiO is a tiny spectrometer that promises to send information about food, nutrition, and medication to a user's smartphone via Bluetooth Low Energy. Tel...
By Jonah Comstock February 21, 2014
Fitbit has announced a voluntary recall of the Fitbit Force after a number of users complained of somewhat mysterious bouts of skin irritation, usually occurring a number of weeks after they began wearing the tracker. "Recently, some Force users have reported skin irritation," Fitbit CEO James Park said in an open letter to customers. "While only 1.7 percent of Force users have reported any type...
By Brian Dolan January 20, 2010
Here's an interesting twist for a smartphone application offering from a big brand: AccuWeather announced today the release of an iPhone application called WeatherMD, which helps users predict when symptoms their various medical conditions might be at their worst during the day because of weather. The app targets users with arthritis, asthma, migraines, allergies and sinus problems. WeatherMD,...