digital health tools

By Heather Mack November 22, 2016
In a far cry from the previous comparison of digital health tools to “snake oil,” the American Medical Association is now openly embracing them, albeit with a healthy dose of discretion and some ground rules.  During the AMA’s Interim Meeting last week in Orlando, the group approved a list of principles to guide coverage and payment policies that support the use of mobile health apps and devices...
By Heather Mack November 9, 2016
Baltimore-based Quantified Care, which makes a mobile platform to help care providers monitor and engage people with chronic conditions, has secured an investment from KiwiVentures II. The amount is undisclosed and is the third investment from KiwiVentures II. “Over the last couple years, KiwiVenture Partners has been an excellent supporter in Quantified Care’s efforts to improve patient care and...
By Heather Mack November 9, 2016
Mothers, in a role that is always on-call, are constantly looking new ways to manage their families' health, and that means having 24/7 access to a doctor, according to a new survey. The survey asked 527 American women, aged 18-59 with children, a number of questions to gauge their relationship with digital health tools such as apps, trackers and telehealth services. The survey was conducted by...
By Heather Mack October 21, 2016
The innovation arm of Brigham and Women’s Hospital has partnered with efficacy-focused digital health company Evidation Health to collaborate on a project measuring the real life impact of digital health solutions on clinical and financial outcomes. The idea is to combine forces to develop methods of creating direct-to-patient trials of digital health solutions, leveraging the research...
By Heather Mack October 10, 2016
Do digital tools lead to better health literacy? Researchers from the University of Texas at Austin explored if there was a link in health knowledge and health information technology, and found, generally speaking, that those with low health literacy were less likely to use tools like apps and online information sources.  In a recent study of 4,974 Americans, researchers explored whether health...
By Heather Mack October 10, 2016
As the focus in healthcare continues to shift towards efficiency and value, doctors say they consider themselves well-equipped to keep up with demands thanks to digital technology and information tools, according to a new survey by Merck Manuals. In a small survey of 220 physicians conducted at a medical conference, most said smartphones in their offices (both their own and their patients’) has...
By Heather Mack August 18, 2016
Senior citizens – by far the largest healthcare consumer base in terms of the cost, duration and intensity of their care – are the least likely to use tools aimed at helping them take a more active role in their health management.  In a survey study recently published in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), researchers looked at the trends in the use of technology and digital...
By Aditi Pai October 19, 2015
Using digital health tools in primary care could save the US healthcare system $10 billion annually, according to a report from Accenture. Accenture said its researchers analyzed the workflows of common physician office visits, including preventive care office visits, routine infant or child health checks, and visits for other conditions like hypertension and diabetes. The research firm...
By Jonah Comstock October 14, 2015
Sixty-three percent of US adults who use fitness or health monitoring technology say that tech has led to significant behavior change, according to a survey of 3,616 US adults conducted by the Deloitte Center for Health Solutions. They found that 28 percent of respondents had used technology to measure fitness and health goals and 23 percent had used technology to monitor a health issue, up from...
By Brian Dolan June 29, 2015
Earlier this month a small MedPanel survey of 415 physicians practicing in the US reportedly found that a very small percentage of them -- just 15 percent -- were discussing health apps or wearables with their patients. After reviewing the raw survey results, however, it's clear the company's press release misstated its survey's findings. (The company has since corrected and updated it). One...

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