JAMA Internal Medicine

By Laura Lovett April 16, 2018
A study published in JAMA Internal Medicine today demonstrated that a smartphone app could lead to small improvements in self-reported medication adherence among participants with poorly controlled hypertension. However, participants using the app had no change in systolic blood pressure compared to their counterparts that were not using the app, according to the study.  Medication adherence has...
By Laura Lovett February 6, 2018
Your Uber is here? A recent study published in JAMA Internal Medicine found that patients who were offered a complimentary lift from ridesharing apps were just as likely to miss a doctor’s appointment as those who were were not. A total of 786 patients participated in the program, and each received up to three additional appointment reminder phone calls from research staff two days before their...
By Jonah Comstock June 27, 2017
A new study of 1,500 patients casts doubt on the effectiveness of several promising medication adherence technologies and strategies, including connected pill bottles and lottery-based incentives. The study, called the HeartStrong Study, was recently published in JAMA Internal Medicine. It was a year-long single-blind study of heart failure patients taking some combination of statins, aspirin,...
By Heather Mack October 12, 2016
While health and medical apps may be helpful in making diagnoses, it seems they still haven’t caught up to doctors. In a new study published in JAMA Internal Medicine, a head-to-head competition between doctors and algorithmic symptom-checking apps, the real human doctors came out on top by a margin of more than two to one. Researchers from Harvard, Brigham & Women’s Hospital and the Human...
By Jonah Comstock March 22, 2016
A new paper published yesterday in JAMA Internal Medicine shows that, when it comes to measuring energy expenditure, many leading fitness trackers have a margin of error of about 200 calories per day in either direction. The study was conducted by Japanese researchers led by Haruka Murakami from the National Institute of Health and Nutrition in Tokyo. Nineteen participants, aged 21 to 50, wore 12...
By Aditi Pai February 15, 2016
There was no significant difference in outcomes among patients with heart failure who used remote patient monitoring tools and those who didn’t, according to a study, called Better Effectiveness After Transition–Heart Failure (BEAT-HF), that was published in JAMA Internal Medicine. iMedicalApps covered this story last week. Researchers recruited 1,437 participants who were hospitalized for heart...
By Jonah Comstock June 3, 2015
Last week, JAMA Internal Medicine published a two-page research letter by the Rand Corporation that played into a national conversation about the efficacy of telemedicine -- specifically Teladoc, a company which is both about to IPO and embroiled in a potentially precedent-setting legal battle with its home state of Texas over whether the Texas Medical Board has the right to regulate the practice...

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