telemedicine

By Brian Dolan September 18, 2012
The UCLA Center for Inflammatory Bowl Diseases just completed the pilot phase of a program that equips patients who have Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis with iPads to help them track and monitor their conditions while staying in touch with their care team throughout the day as needed. Now that the pilot phase is over, UCLA is enrolling about 250 patients in the program. "Using a tablet...
By Brian Dolan August 30, 2012
Every year Inc. Magazine publishes a list of the fastest growing private companies in the United States. While the publication's method has its drawbacks, the resulting list is much more concrete than many of the subjective lists of top companies, apps, or products floating around. Inc. ranks companies by percent growth in revenue over the course of the past few years. What's more Inc. publishes...
By Neil Versel July 18, 2012
Mobile health is showing up at the top of a lot of lists lately. Ahead of next week's United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development in Brazil -- better known as Rio+20 -- Mashable columnist Zoe Fox has outlined five reasons why "mobile is the future of sustainable development." No. 1 is disease response. Fox highlighted one of many mHealth projects underway in sub-Saharan Africa, a Hewlett...
By Neil Versel May 8, 2012
Health IT built for foreign markets generally doesn't translate well to the U.S. A widely heard criticism of many American electronic health records (EHR) systems in the U.S. is that they're designed not primarily to enable clinicians to provide the best patient care, but to help providers produce the documentation they need to get paid. That's just the nature of our inefficient, fee-for-service...
By Neil Versel April 26, 2012
Videoconferencing service provider Vidyo, a growing presence in healthcare because it provides high-quality video with low latency and as encryption to HIPAA standards, is about to get bigger, particularly when it comes to mobile and wireless health. Hackensack, N.J.-based Vidyo is teaming up with Royal Philips Electronics to offer a communications and collaboration platform that includes remote...
By Brian Dolan February 20, 2012
Dublin, Ohio-based HealthSpot inked a deal with Sprint to add wireless connectivity to its primary and specialty care kiosks, called HealthSpot Care4 Stations, that are designed for pharmacies, supermarkets, and workplaces. The kiosks are fully enclosed to provide a private setting for remote care. Patients using the kiosk can visit with doctors in real-time via high-definition videoconferencing...
By Neil Versel February 2, 2012
It's come up again. "I am studying the wireless healthcare market and wanted to understand if there is any difference between wireless healthcare and mobile healthcare (m-health) market," reads the question on the popular LinkedIn Wireless Health group's message board. Some of the responses are expected, others are, shall we say, interesting: "Generally, m-health uses mobile cellular technology,...
By Brian Dolan August 11, 2011
Telemedicine is no longer “turning the corner," American Telemedicine Association (ATA) CEO Jon Linkous wrote in a recent blog post. "For years we talked about reaching the point when telemedicine services became self-sustaining outside of temporary grants, going from promise to reality," wrote Linkous. "We have long passed the point of telemedicine being a new application. After eighteen years...
By Neil Versel March 1, 2011
Proteus Biomedical's Raisin Personal Monitor Think there’s not enough evidence to prove the efficacy of wireless, home-based patient monitoring? Robin Felder, associate director of clinical chemistry and toxicology and a pathology professor at the University of Virginia, disputes that notion. Felder likes to cite a 2007 paper in the Journal of Telemedicine and e-Health. That paper showed a 74...
By Brian Dolan August 18, 2010
Video chat will change mobile phone use for the hearing impaired: One of Apple's commercials for its FaceTime video chat service shows two people using sign language: A group of researchers at the University of Washington is developing their own mobile technology that enables users to transmit American Sign Language (ASL) over cellular networks via device. The software is called MobileASL and was...

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