wireless sensors

By Jonah Comstock March 21, 2013
According to a new report by research firm ON World, 18.2 million health and wellness wireless sensor networks (WSNs) will be shipped worldwide in 2017, generating $16.3 billion in annual revenue. That's up from 1.7 million shipments and $4.9 billion in revenues in 2012. Between 2012 and 2017, the firm reported, health and wellness WSNs that are wearable, implantable, or otherwise mobile-enabled...
By Jonah Comstock March 1, 2013
The Misfit Shine is an example of a partially passive wearable sensor. The future of sensors won't be handheld devices like Star Trek's tricorder. It will be invisible sensors in your shoes, floorboards, and cars that quietly collect your health data, analyze it, and alert you, your doctor, or your loved ones only when something goes wrong. That's the prediction in "Making Sense of Sensors: How...
By Brian Dolan May 16, 2012
Proteus Biomedical's Raisin system Proteus Biomedical raised about $17.5 million in a round of funding it hopes will eventually top $50 million, according to a regulatory filing. The Redwood, California-based company developed an "intelligent medicine" suite of technology called Raisin, which includes, an ingestible biomedical sensor, a wearable, peel-and-stick patch, and a companion smartphone...
By Chris Gullo September 7, 2011
Only 50,000 to 70,000 patients in the United States are remotely monitored, Chuck Parker, executive director of the Continua Health Alliance, told the New York Times in a recent interview. Parker states that one reason adoption is still modest is a lack of financial incentives for some of the big players in health. Heart patients that can be monitored remotely at home are far less lucrative than...
By Chris Gullo August 31, 2011
A new research paper published in the Journal of Participatory Medicine, “Exploring Everyday Health Routines of a Low Socioeconomic Population through Multimedia Elicitations,” examines the ways mobile phones can influence healthy behavior in low socioeconomic environments where chronic diseases are common due to poor health. The study attempts to illuminate how limited income, lack of...
By Chris Gullo August 18, 2011
The market for wearable devices will exceed 100 million units annually by 2016, reports ABI Research in a new study. A study released by ABI last June estimated that 80 million of those units would be fitness sensors. The announcement comes on the heels of yesterday's news of an expected $1.34B wireless health industry also by 2016. According to ABI, adoption over the next five years will be...
By Neil Versel July 28, 2011
Dr. Brigitte Piniewski is convinced that mobile and wireless technologies can bring the kinds of improvements in population health that policymakers can only dream of. "I really think that's where the vision is at," she says. Two weeks ago at the eighth annual Healthcare Unbound conference in San Diego, Piniewski said that the biggest trend she's seeing in mobile and wireless health is...
By Brian Dolan October 12, 2010
At the Health 2.0 event in San Francisco last week, the West Wireless Health Institute's CEO Don Casey announced that Alan Viars' startup Videntity had won the Institute's developer challenge, Accelerating Wireless Health Adoption through a Standardized Social Network Platform. The contest called on developers to find a low-cost, secure way to share real-time health information from a personal...
By Brian Dolan July 7, 2010
Honolulu, Hawaii-based Kai Medical received 510(k) clearance from the Food and Drug Administration to market an updated version of its wireless respiratory rate monitor, Noncontact Respiratory Spot Rate Check 200. Kai claims that currently approaches for measuring respiratory rate are difficult, which leads this vital sign to be inaccurately measured, infrequently measured or inconsistently...
By Brian Dolan April 8, 2010
A new feature story in the Economist takes the pulse of wireless healthcare with an article titled: "Wireless health care: When your carpet calls your doctor." The reference is to the sensors-laced "magic carpet" that Intel has invested in for fall prevention among the elderly population. The article launches into the subject with an interesting lead: "Pundits have long predicted that advances in...