100Plus app to highlight how small health behavior changes tweak life expectancy

By Brian Dolan
Share

100PlusAt the Health 2.0 event in San Francisco last week, 100Plus, the first startup to leverage Practice Fusion's data set demo'd a number of concepts from its upcoming app, which aims to help people get interested in the "small things" they can do to live a healthier life.

100Plus co-founder Chris Hogg told Health 2.0 attendees that his startup was not interested in activity at the gym but rather in alerting people to health opportunities or "hops" like walking hills with views in your neighborhood and "healthifying" your commute by taking stairs instead of the escalator. Hogg said that these small things have become very undervalued and people have been trained to think that the only way to be healthy is to go for a run or head to the gym.

Perhaps the most interesting concept embedded in 100Plus' forthcoming signature app is its Lifescore, which gives users a sense of how these small actions can affect their longterm health by adding small increments of additional time to their life expectancy, which starts at 78.1 years for everyone since that is the general life expectancy, according to Hogg.

"As we learn about you the Lifescore changes," Hogg said. "Because I'm a man my score actually automatically goes down because women live longer than men on average... because I live in San Francisco it goes up because people here live longer on average." Age, height, and weight can affect the Lifescore based on a comparison between a user and the average BMI of people like them. Hogg said the data is all based on CDC data sets available from the federal government as well as structured clinical data from its parent company PracticeFusion.

Users of the 100Plus app will be able to see how these small actions -- these hops -- might change their Lifescore if they did them on a regular basis. The app also shares a hop that one user creates with others and 100Plus users can see how their hops have inspired others to lead healthier lives. Currently each hop requires the user to snap a photo of the activity, which -- given the requisite image and crowd sourcing strategy is reminiscent of Massive Health's The Eatery app.

For more: 100Plus has a promo video that explains some of the concepts featured in its forthcoming app and that can be viewed over at Vimeo here.