IHS: About 4M patients will use remote patient monitoring technologies by 2020

By Aditi Pai
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Sotera Wireless's ViSi Mobile monitor. Sotera Wireless's ViSi Mobile monitor.

Some 4 million patients globally will remotely monitor their health conditions by 2020, up from 664,000 patients in 2014, according to a new report from IHS Technology.

IHS also broke out estimates for congestive heart failure, diabetes, COPD, and mental health. Just over 324,000 patients monitored congestive heart failure in in 2014 and IHS predicts the number of patients monitoring this condition will grow at a CAGR of 34 percent. Of the 4 million patients monitoring their conditions in 2020, IHS estimates about 1.9 million of these will monitor congestive heart failure.

The next largest group IHS expects will grow is patients with diabetes. About 120,300 patients were monitoring diabetes remotely in 2014 and this number of patients will grow at a CAGR of 35 percent to 712,800 in 2020.

Some 80,900 patients monitored COPD in 2014. By 2020, the number of patients monitoring COPD will grow at a CAGR of 29 percent to 371,000. While the number of patients monitoring hypertension remotely in 2014 -- 83,000 -- is about the same as those tracking COPD in 2014, IHS predicts the number of hypertension patients to grow at a more rapid pace -- with a CAGR of 38 percent -- to 574,000 in 2020.

The number of patients monitoring mental health remotely will grow at a similar pace to those tracking hypertension. In 2014, the number of patients remotely monitoring mental health was 26,000, but it will grow at a CAGR of 38 percent to 182,900.

In early 2013, InMedica, a division of IHS, found that in 2012, healthcare providers remotely monitored about 308,000 patients worldwide. By 2017, the research firm said they predict that number to spike to 1.8 million patients, though this estimate has decreased since InMedica's report first came out. According to IHS' most recent estimates, the number of patients monitoring health conditions remotely is on track to reach 1.5 million by 2017.