Boston Scientific's concept iPhone app, Latitude

By Brian Dolan
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Boston Scientific Latitude Connected iPhone appEarlier this month at the Body Computing Conference in Los Angeles, Boston Scientific showed off a concept iPhone app, called Latitude Connected, that is currently focused on cardiac rhythm care management, but its full range of functions enable physicians to access patient records, monitor implanted devices, tap into patient support networks and schedule follow-up care, according to a report from Fast Company.

"It's all about capturing those micromoments in the day--when a surgeon is waiting for the OR to be prepped for the next implant but can't sit down at a computer, when a patient's family member calls at 6 a.m. with a question but the office isn't opened yet," Joseph Weber, Director of R+D for Boston Scientific's Latitude application told the magazine. "Mobility brings so many compelling values to the system."

While Latitude is currently in the market as a patient monitoring system, physicians told Boston Scientific the time to take it mobile was now. The prototype application was then developed and conceived by Dr. Leslie Saxon of University of Southern California in conjunction with an iPhone development team in USC's Viterbi Engineering School.

"We developed this app, in cooperation with Boston Scientific," Saxon, who also organized the Body Computing Conference, told mobihealthnews. "The work was supported by a grant from [Boston Scientific]. The intent is to bring the remote data, streaming from the implanted device, to the physician and connect the physician to the patient, family, referring doctor and support personnel seamlessly."

Here's the official description of Boston Scientific's iPhone app from the Body Computing Conference team: "Latitude Connected: Boston Scientific's iPhone app, also co-developed at USC and conceived by Dr. Saxon, enables physicians to share patient physiological data with other physicians and to communicate information to their patients such as the battery level on their pacemaker."

For more on concept app, read this report from Fast Company