Samsung senior phone's "medical" services

By Brian Dolan
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Samsung HavenThose in the market for a "senior-friendly" phone just got another option: Samsung's Haven, available to Verizon Wireless subscribers as of today. The Haven features a dedicated In Case of Emergency (ICE) button, adjustable fonts to make it easier to read text on the phone's screen, speech recognition software and well-being and medical management tools.

The well-being and medical management tools apparently consist of "reminder alarms," "fitness guide" and "stress relieving music." Not exactly a comprehensive suite of mobile health services, but perhaps fairly representative of the majority of health and medical smartphone apps intended for use by consumers/patients and available in app stores today.

Here's the pitch for the phone on the Verizon online store site: "The Samsung Haven makes it easy to speak, hear and be heard. Featuring a slim design and large keys for easy dialing, the Haven is ideal for anyone seeking a phone that’s easy to use. One–touch access to emergency numbers, voicemail, speakerphone and voice commands offer effortless execution, and built–in lifestyle applications like reminder alarms, fitness guide and stress relieving music are perfect for maintaining and organizing an active lifestyle. With such manageable features, the Haven is the right phone for those who want the easy life."

Jitterbug's phone services for seniors, which runs on Verizon Wireless' network by the way, offers a growing list of health and medical services for its subscribers: Live Nurse, Heart Healthy Tips, Wellness Calls, 5Start Emergency (PERS coming in the fall). It has also tinkered with a diabetes management service (D-Coach by WellDoc) and a Medication Reminders service with Meridian Health. (more on Jitterbug's services here.)

Check out the Samsung Haven phone over at Verizon's site

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NASA astronaut Scott Kelly checks out the Microsoft HoloLens aboard a space station on February 20, 2016. The device is part of NASA's project Sidekick, which is exploring the use of augmented reality to reduce crew training requirements and increase the efficiency with which astronauts can work in space. (Photo by NASA via Getty Images)