Eric Wicklund

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By Eric Wicklund 08:37 amAugust 14, 2015
Terry Duesterhoeft is president and CEO of A&D Medical, which manufactures and distributes advanced biometric monitoring solutions including blood pressure monitors, weight scales, activity trackers and other health monitoring devices for consumer and professional use. Prior to joining A&D, he was the president of Honeywell HomMed and spent more than 10 years with GE Healthcare in...
By Eric Wicklund 08:42 amAugust 12, 2015
How can emojis and Fitbits be used to connect healthcare providers with patients suffering from depression? An app developed at the University of Missouri just might make that happen. The university and its associated MU Health Care, working with researchers at the Missouri University of Science and Technology and the Tiger Institute for Health Innovation, have developed an app that serves as a...
By Eric Wicklund 08:34 amAugust 12, 2015
UnitedHealthcare has launched a new version of its Health4Me app for Medicaid members in 17 states, opening the popular mHealth platform to a population that often faces challenges in finding, accessing and paying for healthcare. Officials say the app, available on iPhone and Android devices and with versions targeted for the payer's 13 million-plus health plan members and Medicaid members as...
By Eric Wicklund 09:31 amAugust 11, 2015
Google's reorganization isn't expected to affect its mHealth interests that much, though it could allow the Internet giant to take a few more chances with new technology like the much-maligned Google Glass. In splitting into the Google brand and a bunch of subsidiaries under the "Alphabet" name, company co-founders Larry Page and Sergey Brin said they giving their non-Internet interests more room...
By Eric Wicklund 10:28 amAugust 10, 2015
Even though the prototype was panned by many critics and a new version isn't due out until next year, Google Glass is finding willing users in healthcare. One recent test found that it may have even saved the lives of several poison victims in a hospital ED. The latest success story comes from the University of Massachusetts Medical School, where researchers used the interactive eyewear on a test...
By Eric Wicklund 01:40 pmAugust 7, 2015
Despite concerns from healthcare officials, federal regulators have opened up the wireless frequency used by remote monitoring equipment in hospitals – such as cardiac and fetal monitors – to a wide range of new devices, while also expanding the buffer zone around those hospitals to prevent interference. The Federal Communications Commission voted to amend its Part 15 rules to enable "TV white...
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By Eric Wicklund 08:16 amAugust 7, 2015
Michelle Snyder is the senior vice president and chief marketing officer of Welltok. She was most recently an executive-in-residence at InterWest Partners, investing in digital health companies and serving as an advisor to InterWest portfolio companies. She was also one of the early executives at Epocrates, spending more than a decade there, and has worked as a health strategy consultant with the...
By Eric Wicklund 12:39 pmAugust 6, 2015
The mHealth Summit is undergoing a transformation. The six-year-old summit, held each winter at the Gaylord National Resort and Conference Center just outside Washington, D.C., is part of a new, larger event this year. The four-day event is now called the Connected Health Conference. It also gets a new time slot. The conference will be held from Nov. 8-11, about one month earlier than past...
By Eric Wicklund 11:03 amAugust 6, 2015
ResearchKit is going global. Stanford University researchers have announced that their MyHeart Counts app, one of the first to be launched in March through Apple's ResearchKit platform, is now available to residents in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. It's reportedly the first ResearchKit to extend outside the U.S. Via the iPhone, Stanford researchers are collecting physical activity and cardiac...
By Eric Wicklund 09:14 amAugust 4, 2015
Recent FDA approval of the first 3D-printed drug is being hailed as a breakthrough in precision medicine – and perhaps the first step toward printing medications at home. That's admittedly a long way off, but Ohio-based Aprecia Pharmaceuticals and Forbes are touting the Aug. 3 approval by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration of SPIRITAM as a huge step forward in the development of personalized...