Eric Wicklund

By Eric Wicklund 09:40 amOctober 30, 2015
A recent study on the use of wearables to help smokers kick the habit raises some potentially controversial questions about data ownership and timely interventions. Conducted by the Memphis-based Center for Excellence for Mobile Sensor Data-to-Knowledge (MD2K), the study uses sensors to detect when a smoker relapses. Called the puffMarker, it consists of a wrist-borne motion sensor and a chest-...
By Eric Wicklund 08:45 amOctober 30, 2015
Wearables may be all the rage in the consumer-facing market these days, but healthcare providers are wary about adopting them or adapting to them. After all, most doctors don't want to know how many steps someone has taken today or what he or she has eaten. This isn't to say healthcare is avoiding the market. With platforms like Apple's ResearchKit and HealthKit and the steadily-growing number of...
By Eric Wicklund 09:12 amOctober 29, 2015
Healthcare providers need to shift their emphasis to population health to adapt to the new value-based care landscape – and for that, they're going to need to spend money. That's the upshot of Premier's fall 2015 Economic Outlook survey, which finds that almost 65 percent of healthcare C-suite respondents plan to increase capital spending in the coming year – and almost 40 percent of that group...
By Eric Wicklund 09:46 amOctober 28, 2015
What do physicians do when they have an urgent question at the point of care that needs to be answered? Nowadays, they'll take out their smartphone. Roughly 90 percent of clinicians own at least one mobile device, and more than 70 percent use it for work-related purposes, according to the most recent surveys. And they're not just making a quick phone call to a colleague – they're searching for...
By Eric Wicklund 10:12 amOctober 27, 2015
As healthcare providers look to expand their population health efforts, they're going to need to learn how to communicate with consumers. That means reaching them where and when they want to be reached, with messaging they'll accept and appreciate. "You can't engage people with 'eat your veggies' messaging," says Robb Smith. "You need a full spectrum of support. People want answers on motivation...
By Eric Wicklund 09:34 amOctober 26, 2015
A continuing criticism of mHealth is that it's been too focused on doctors, leaving nurses to pick up the scraps or benefit from the occasional forward-thinking health system. But with concepts like care coordination and patient engagement sharing the spotlight lately, providers are starting to realize that the nurse might benefit from a few of those digital health innovations that doctors and...
By Eric Wicklund 08:25 pmOctober 25, 2015
The Disruptive Women are ready to be disruptive again. An online advocacy group of more than 100 women, Disruptive Women in Health Care has been a part of the mHealth Summit since its inception some seven years ago, combining an education session with a highly anticipated evening social that focuses on networking and "substantive idea-sharing," according to founder, president and CEO Robin...
By Eric Wicklund 10:42 amOctober 23, 2015
So just what is a "care team" anyway? Thanks to digital health tools and the trend toward delivering care outside the hospital or clinic, healthcare providers are redefining the team approach. No longer does it just mean the doctor, nurse and few others in the hospital or clinic – now it extends out to family caregivers, friends, home healthcare providers, specialists, therapists and pharmacists...
By Eric Wicklund 09:22 amOctober 22, 2015
A portable ultrasound device recently used in Africa is making its way to the U.S., giving clinicians the ability to conduct, store and share images at the point of care. The device is a collaboration between Fujifilm SonoSite and Trice Imaging, whose Tricefy sharing, collaboration and routing software has been integrated with Fujifilm's iViz portable ultrasound unit. It was used in a Qualcomm-...
By Eric Wicklund 08:28 amOctober 21, 2015
Two studies – one on each side of the Atlantic – are throwing some shade over the idea that mHealth can help those with depression. A two-year study by the Oregon Health and Science University in Portland of some 11,000 Americans age 50 and older has found that face-to-face interactions work better at staving off depression than regular contact by phone, e-mail or text. In the UK, meanwhile, a...