Digital wound care company Swift Medical lands $11.6M

By Laura Lovett
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Digital wound care company Swift Medical has just announced that it has secured $11.6 million in a Series A funding round led by Data Collective in Palo Alto, California, with participation from Montreal-based Real Ventures, Relay Ventures in Toronto, DHVC in Palo Alto, and Business Development Bank of Canadian Montreal. 

“This growth funding enables us to expand our reach and bring Swift’s solution to every bedside in every hospital and care facility,” Carlo Perez, cofounder and CEO of Swift Medical, said in a statement. 

The technology is able to capture wound care information by waving the smartphone above the injured site in a “wand-like fashion.” It is also able to determine the depth of the injury. According to the website, the platform does not require anymore equipment than a smartphone. 

The platform then immediately analyzes the wound by using proprietary machine vision algorithms. The information is then sent to a patient’s EMR or the Swift dashboard, which includes wound care data. It doesn’t require physical contact and reduces the risk of contamination, according to the company’s webpage.  

“There are more patients worldwide suffering from chronic wounds than from lung cancer, breast cancer, colon cancer, and leukemia combined,” Perez said in a statement. “By augmenting the abilities of clinicians and facility administrators to deliver the best possible wound care management, we’re helping them heal over 10,000 patients a month. And we’re just getting started.”

The Toronto-based startup said its technology has been adopted in over 1,000 healthcare facilities and is managing more than 100,000 beds across North America. 

In 2016, Swift Medical partnered with PointClickCare on the Skin and Wound smartphone app. The technology is powered by Swift Medical and is aimed to help senior care. The app integrates with PointClickCare's EHR platform and helps providers track a patients' wound progress. 

This isn’t the only digital health company specializing in wounds. In January, research showed that the app WoundCare could be an effective way to detect surgical site infections, reducing readmission.