Spok expands communications platform with multidevice workflow support

The Spok Go and Spok Conduct products are available now, with Spok Navigate coming in the future.
By Dave Muoio
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Medical communications company Spok has announced a new suite of tools for its Spok Care Connect platform here at HIMSS19 in Orlando, Florida.

Among these are Spok Go, a multidevice app for care team messaging; Spok Conduct, a cloud-based workflow engine with clinical alerting and alarm management support; and Spok Navigate, a tool for operators that helps guide patients and their caregivers through their encounters with a health system.

Spok Go and Spok Conduct are now available to customers, while Spok Navigate is coming soon. 

“Our experience supporting more than 1,900 hospitals across the US has helped us create a solution that positions healthcare providers for success today and supports them with faster, smarter clinical communications for the next decade,” Hemant Goel, president of Spok, said in a statement. “This latest evolution of our communication technology will allow our customers to leverage integrations to their existing Spok suite of solutions, while keeping security in the forefront.”

Spok's system specifically ensures secure messaging within the hospital system. It allows providers to send secure text messages, set preferences and encrypt paging. It can also assist in physician and nurse scheduling and set clinical alerts and notifications, according to the company’s webpage.

With the new features, Spok’s platform will now allow clinicians to access the messaging system from either their Windows and Mac desktops, or by using an Apple or Android device. Users will also be able to rout or escalate any alert messages to the best person.

“Spok Care Connect is a powerful system of action with deep EHR interoperability,”  Vincent D. Kelly, president and CEO of Spok, said in a statement. “It includes a robust workflow engine that will enable hospitals and health systems to consolidate their clinical workflows into a single system.”

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NASA astronaut Scott Kelly checks out the Microsoft HoloLens aboard a space station on February 20, 2016. The device is part of NASA's project Sidekick, which is exploring the use of augmented reality to reduce crew training requirements and increase the efficiency with which astronauts can work in space. (Photo by NASA via Getty Images)