AmblyoPlay launches new digital therapy for people with 'lazy eye'

The new vision therapy technology will be gamified and send physical rewards in the mail.
By Laura Lovett
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This morning Slovenia-based startup AmblyoPlay released its new digital vision therapy platform aimed at helping individuals with amblyopia, commonly called “lazy eye.” 

The subscription-based technology, which can be used by adults or kids, gamifies vision therapy for the patient. Users can earn rewards, which can be sent to their home. The platform also gives parents a chance to monitor their child’s progress through a progression tracker and share those results with providers. The company is quick to point out this technology should not be used in lieu of a doctor’s visit. 

“AmblyoPlay does not replace the expertise provided by a doctor — eye care specialists are essential to any eye diagnosis or vision therapy,” Žan Menart, CEO of AmblyoPlay, said in a statement. “Our software serves as another tool to improve visual function of patients and improve their quality of life.”

 Amblyopia is a condition in which, “vision of one of the eyes is reduced because the eye and the brain are not working together properly,” according to the National Eye Institute. If it is not treated in childhood the condition typically continues into adulthood, according to the CDC. 

“We realized quickly that for our target age group — children aged four to 14 — making the therapy engaging and rewarding was the first step in supporting parents and doctors as they treat amblyopia,” Menart said. “Lazy eye can lead to depth perception and vision problems that have long-lasting effects, like reading and learning difficulties, social trauma, disadvantages playing sports, difficulty obtaining a driver’s license and more.”

WHY IT MATTERS 

According to the CDCamblyopia is the most common visual impairment in children. It impacts 2% to 3% of the population, according to the agency. Currently the condition is treated through patching, where a patient wears a patch over their stronger eye for a few weeks or months, and the second is a type of drug that gives the dominant eye a blurred vision, according to the National Eye Institutes. 

THE LARGER TREND 

This isn’t the first digital health product developed to address amblyopia. In April GoCheck, maker of a smartphone app that screens young children for the condition, raised $6 million in Series B investments. 

There are also several digital health companies that have developed at-home vision tests including OpternativeEyeQue and Warby Parker.

This morning Slovenia-based startup AmblyoPlay released its new digital vision therapy platform aimed at helping individuals with amblyopia, commonly called “lazy eye.” 

The subscription-based technology, which can be used by adults or kids, gamifies vision therapy for the patient. Users can earn rewards, which can be sent to their home. The platform also gives parents a chance to monitor their child’s progress through a progression tracker and share those results with providers. The company is quick to point out this technology should not be used in lieu of a doctor’s visit. 

“AmblyoPlay does not replace the expertise provided by a doctor — eye care specialists are essential to any eye diagnosis or vision therapy,” Žan Menart, CEO of AmblyoPlay, said in a statement. “Our software serves as another tool to improve visual function of patients and improve their quality of life.”

Amblyopia is a condition in which “vision of one of the eyes is reduced because the eye and the brain are not working together properly,” according to the National Eye Institute. If it is not treated in childhood, the condition typically continues into adulthood, according to the CDC. 

“We realized quickly that for our target age group — children aged four to 14 — making the therapy engaging and rewarding was the first step in supporting parents and doctors as they treat amblyopia,” Menart said. “Lazy eye can lead to depth perception and vision problems that have long-lasting effects, like reading and learning difficulties, social trauma, disadvantages playing sports, difficulty obtaining a driver’s license and more.”

WHY IT MATTERS 

According to the CDCamblyopia is the most common visual impairment in children. It impacts 2% to 3% of the population, according to the agency. Currently, the condition is treated through patching, where a patient wears a patch over their stronger eye for a few weeks or months, and the second is a type of drug that gives the dominant eye a blurred vision, according to the National Eye Institutes. 

THE LARGER TREND 

This isn’t the first digital health product developed to address amblyopia. In April GoCheck, maker of a smartphone app that screens young children for the condition, raised $6 million in Series B investments. 

There are also several digital health companies that have developed at-home vision tests including OpternativeEyeQue and Warby Parker.