Patients want technology, remain frustrated with healthcare system, ResMed survey shows

Six out of 10 responders are going to online resources before seeing a doctor.
By Laura Lovett
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More than half of Americans are using at least one digital data collection tool to monitor their health, according to a new survey released by ResMed, maker of connected respiratory devices. 

The report, which came out last Friday, was based on the survey results of 3,001 participants based in the U.S. In June, responders over the age of 18 years took the 15-minute survey. The results comprised 37% Baby Boomers, 26% Gen Xers, 28% Millennials and 9% Gen Zers. 

Overwhelmingly, survey responders said that it should be easier to find medical care (78%) and a majority said they were sick of feeling like their healthcare doesn’t matter in the current healthcare system (63%). The report found that 6 out of 10 consumers use the internet to try to diagnose themselves — and that number is higher for Millennials (76%). 

However, the survey found that technology is already improving the doctor-patient relationship for 54% of its responders. In the future, 47% of responders said they would like to communicate through text, while 38% said they would like to participate in video chats. 

WHY IT MATTERS 

These results demonstrate that survey responders are interested in using technology more often in their healthcare experience. 

"There is a desire for technology to play a larger role in the future of their healthcare by helping patients find care easier, communicate with their doctor more efficiently and even help in the diagnosis/treatment phase,” authors of the study wrote. 

However, it also reveals that the current healthcare system is still creating frustration for many users. Plus, the results show that Millennials are taking their health into their own hands and avoiding a doctor more often than Baby Boomers. 

THE LARGER TREND 

This isn’t the first survey of the year to find that many are turning to online resources. Data from Harmony Healthcare IT showed that 73% of Millennials reported going online for medical advice rather than seeing a doctor.