Annals of Internal Medicine

By Jonah Comstock 05:00 pm August 21, 2017
A new study published today in Annals of Internal Medicine and sponsored by Dexcom shows that a continuous glucose monitor could lower the HbA1c scores of people with Type 2 diabetes, and that acceptance of the technology is high among that group as well. Right now, continuous glucose monitoring is a technology mostly used by people with Type 1 diabetes, many of whom administer insulin via an...
By Aditi Pai 12:06 pm February 16, 2016
People are most incentivized to walk regularly when they are told they would lose something for failing to do so, as opposed to being told they would gain something, according to a randomized controlled trial of 281 adults recently published in the Annals of Internal Medicine.  The 26-week trial was conducted between March and September 2014. This study was funded by the National Institute on...
By Aditi Pai 07:53 am January 27, 2015
Boston's Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center received a $450,000 grant from The Commonwealth Fund this week to develop a program called OurNotes that allows patients to contribute to their medical records. The program is an extension of the well-known OpenNotes initiative and will include collaboration with a handful of other providers across the country. "This is really building for the future...
By Aditi Pai 06:59 am December 2, 2014
Using a smartphone app to monitor weight loss is effective if the user is willing to self-monitor calories, but for most patients, using a health app won't result in a substantial weight change, according to a UCLA study in the Annals of Internal Medicine of 212 primary care patients. Researchers asked 105 participants to download the MyFitnessPal app, while the other 107 participants, the...
By Brian Dolan 04:36 am October 4, 2012
[Reminder: Be sure to join us today at 2PM Eastern for the Inevitable, Imminent Rise of Remote Patient Monitoring webinar featuring presentations by MobiHealthNews, Preventice, and The Mayo Clinic. If you are not one of the 800 who has registered so far, don't miss out and sign up right here -- it's free!] The final results from a yearlong study of how patients and their primary care providers...
By Brian Dolan 01:46 pm December 21, 2011
Patients overwhelmingly want access to the notes their physicians take during visits, according to one study that was recently published in the Annals of Internal Medicine. About 95 percent of patients who participated in the twelve-month study (and the survey that followed it) said that giving patients access to the notes was a good idea, while between 69 percent to 81 percent of those...