Autism

The AI-enabled Superpower Glass system was recently shown to improve socialization skills among children with autism spectrum disorder.
By Dave Muoio April 10, 2019
Cognoa, the maker of a machine learning-based app for tracking children’s health and development, announced today that it has exclusively licensed an AI system designed to improve socialization skills in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) from the Stanford University School of Medicine. Called Superpower Glass, the technology runs on Google Glass and is designed to encourage children’s...
By Laura Lovett March 27, 2019
A new artificial intelligence system that employs Google Glass may be a resource for helping children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) improve socialization skills, according to a recent study published in JAMA Pediatrics.  The small clinical trial found that children using the wearable technology at home showed significant improvements in socialization skills, compared to their counterparts...
By Dave Muoio March 25, 2019
Phone-based workouts. Workout app maker Kaia Health has expanded its service from squat support to full-body fitness with the launch of a new version of its app. Like its predecessor the Kaia Perfect Squat Challenge, the Kaia Personal Trainer app uses smartphone camera motion tracking to monitor and log the user’s reps, while helping users develop personalized fitness plans. Of note, the company...
virtual reality
By Piers Ford February 20, 2019
Third Eye NeuroTech’s Blue Room immersive virtual reality (VR) technology is in the spotlight following the publication of research which revealed its effectiveness in treating phobias and anxieties for children and adults. The Blue Room was developed by specialists at Newcastle University in the UK in tandem with the Durham-based tech firm and has been made available as an NHS treatment through...
Cognoa child development assessment app for autism
By Dave Muoio August 27, 2018
In May, a pair of studies were published in the journals Autism Research and the Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association (JAMIA) that evaluated Cognoa’s artificial intelligence-based tool for early identification of autism in children. While both investigations suggest that the tool’s performance significantly exceeded those of other standardized screeners, comparing the two...
By MobiHealthNews August 6, 2018
Google Glass system assists children with autism. A pilot exploratory study recently published in Nature suggests that a novel system running on Google Glass and an Android smartphone can assist with social-affective learning for children with autism. Conducted among 14 families using the tool three times a week for an average of 72 days, the researchers report improved scores among the children...
By Dave Muoio June 7, 2018
Deep breaths. Henry Schein Medical announced today the launch of its EasyOne Air Spirometer, a device designed to measure lung function and improve diagnosis of COPD. Connected via Bluetooth, the spirometer includes a touch screen interface, EHR connectivity, and proprietary technology to improve device calibration and accuracy. "We are excited to work with ndd [the device’s designer] to provide...
By Laura Lovett May 15, 2018
Earlier this month Otsimo, a digital health startup focused on developmental disorders, rolled out an expansion of its app in the US to help kids with autism, down syndrome, and other cognitive learning disorders.  The Turkish startup offers more than 50 different games through its app that target specific areas of development. For example, the app lets kids focus on specific skills such as...
By Laura Lovett April 19, 2018
Data analytics startup Trayt is launching a new app that helps patients living with neurodevelopmental and brain disorders, as well as their caregivers, track behavioral and non-behavioral symptoms. The app has a comorbid rating scale, as well as measurements of how effective treatments are. It can also give progress reports and provides users with actionable insights.  “As a parent of a child...
By Heather Mack April 5, 2017
There’s plenty of debate about the impact of consumer-level computer or video games on children’s brains. But a new study from the University of California, San Francisco published in PLOS One shows that, in a clinical setting, games that have been developed to function as a medical device may be beneficial to children with certain cognitive impairments. UCSF and Akili Interactive Labs, which is...