Google Glass

By Jonah Comstock May 20, 2014
More evidence that, at least where doctors at the point of care are concerned, Google Glass is the new iPad: UC Irvine, one of the first medical schools to issue iPads to its students, is now equipping them with Google Glass as well. The school won't be equipping each freshman with a $1,500 Glass device like it did with iPads. Instead, the program will have a total of 30 to 40 Glass units on hand...
By Aditi Pai May 13, 2014
Developer of a Google Glass app for doctors, Remedy, launched a pilot study with three Harvard hospitals in which they will provide physician assistants who are handling night coverage in hospitals -- a time when doctors are not around as often as during the day -- with Google Glass so that they can send their point of view videos to supervising doctors. From this pilot, Remedy will measure how...
By Aditi Pai April 17, 2014
This week, Google opened Google Glass sales to the general public for one day only and before the day ended the limited supply of Glass devices that Google offered sold out. While there is clearly some demand for the wearable device, another camp is more skeptical about the role Google Glass will play in the life of consumers and professionals. One prediction is that Google Glass will find...
By Jonah Comstock April 14, 2014
Beth Israel Deaconess Hospital has begun working with a startup called Wearable Intelligence to deploy Google Glass in the emergency department. The hospital has four Glass devices shared among 10 emergency department physicians, including CIO John Halamka, who thinks Glass has the potential to, in some ways, be the new iPad. "So I said a couple of years ago, if you had a tablet computer with a...
By Jonah Comstock March 11, 2014
Lead Researcher Dr. Paul Porter dons Google Glass in a video from RI Hospital's website. Rhode Island Hospital has begun a feasability study using Google Glass to provide dermatology consultations to patients in the emergency room. For six months, emergency room patients who require a dermatology consult and consent to the study will be examined by ER physicians wearing a stripped-down version...
By Aditi Pai March 4, 2014
Researchers in the Ozcan Research group at UCLA's Henry Samueli School of Engineering and Applied Science have developed a Google Glass app that allows users to interpret diagnostic test strips for a variety of diseases and health conditions, such as HIV, malaria, and prostate cancer. The research was published in ACS Nano, a journal that publishes articles on nanoscience and nanotechnology...
By Aditi Pai January 17, 2014
Google has officially announced its intentions to develop smart contact lenses, as a noninvasive method of measuring blood glucose levels in people with diabetes, according to Google's blog. "At Google[x], we wondered if miniaturized electronics—think: chips and sensors so small they look like bits of glitter, and an antenna thinner than a human hair—might be a way to crack the mystery of tear...
By Jonah Comstock November 20, 2013
Google made big news recently when it announced Google Calico, a new venture that would apply "some longer term, moonshot thinking around healthcare and biotechnology," putting the minds at Google toward the problems of aging and illness. Calico is far from Google's first venture into health or wellness, however. The company's (ultimately failed) PHR venture Google Health was one high profile...
By Jonah Comstock August 5, 2013
Google Glass may or may not be on its way to catching on with the consumer crowd, but, if nothing else, it shows that Google doesn't think consumers will have a problem wearing a computer on their head. As wearable health real estate goes, the head is a contentious spot for a sensor, but a number of companies are making a go for it. Brainwave sensors, like Emotiv, which has already raised $400,...
By Brian Dolan August 1, 2013
Google Glass is the highest profile wearable device right now. While it exists and thousands of beta testers have prototype versions of it, it's not commercially available yet. What's striking about the current Google Glass conversation -- especially in healthcare -- is that so little of it is critical. Even the iPad at launch stirred emotions among physicians and health IT types who were quick...