heart attack

By Dave Muoio 03:15 pm June 19, 2019
In an effort to tackle in-home cardiac arrest, University of Washington researchers have devised a novel contactless system that uses smartphones or voice-based personal assistants to identify telltale breathing patterns that accompany an attack. The proof-of-concept strategy, described in an NPJ Digital Medicine paper published this morning, involved a supervised machine learning model called a...
By Dave Muoio 11:21 am October 19, 2017
Argentinian ambulance doctors are using WhatsApp to fasttrack their patients’ care. Study data presented at the Argentine Congress of Cardiology’s 2017 conference suggests that using the free messaging app to send diagnostic electrocardiograms (ECGs) directly to a hospital’s catheterization lab allowed heart attack patients to bypass the emergency department and reduce mortality. “We found that...
By Jonah Comstock 02:58 pm May 3, 2017
San Francisco-based ReThink Medical raised $3 million to develop a medical wearable to predict and prevent heart failure. The round was led by Emergent Medical with additional funding from Norwich Ventures and Launch Capital. The company is also operating with a previously-awarded NIH grant as well as a strategic partnership with Japanese medical device company Terumo Corporation, which includes...
By Heather Mack 03:42 pm October 3, 2016
Health tech startup iBeat launched the pre-ordering phase of its heart-monitoring watch on Indiegogo, giving the company time to build out a commercial market and establish the device, iBeat Life Monitor, as a tool for preventing sudden death from cardiac arrest or stroke.  Backed by Dr. Mehmet Oz, host of the “Dr. Oz Show,” and founded by former Practice Fusion CEO Ryan Howard, the iBeat Life...
By Jonah Comstock 07:23 am July 16, 2015
Utah health system Intermountain Healthcare -- and other, as yet unknown providers -- appear to be investigating AliveCor's smartphone ECG device in a clinical context, to determine whether the iPhone version of the device is comparable with traditional 12-lead ECGs. The trial aims to test the device with 50 patients who have possible ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction (STEMI), a common type of...
By Jonah Comstock 12:02 pm April 1, 2014
According to an as-yet unpublished study, the Mayo Clinic has found that incorporating a smartphone app into cardiac rehabilitation can reduce emergency room visits and hospital readmissions by 40 percent. "The takeaway is that digital health, mobile health, can be used for cardiovascular disease prevention, especially in a high risk group," lead researcher Dr. R. Jay Widmer told MobiHealthNews...