Johns Hopkins

Conrad Tucker, Penn State associate professor of engineering design and industrial engineering, compares VideoVitals' reading against that of a Masimo Rad-97 patient monitoring device. (Photo courtesy Penn State)

By Jonah Comstock December 10, 2018
Researchers from Penn State and Johns Hopkins, backed by a $100,000 grant from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, are developing technology that could read peoples' vital signs from up to four feet away using only a cellphone camera.  The team has published a detailed account of the work in the open access journal Biomedical Optics Express. But the funding from the foundation will allow the...
By Dave Muoio April 27, 2018
Replacing the frequent home visits often necessary for tuberculosis treatment with video visits facilitated by an app appears to be a cost-effective, well-received means of ensuring adherence throughout therapy, according to a recently published pilot study. Because TB is, airborne, highly infectious, and increasingly resistant to antibiotics, treatment and prevention of the disease often...
By Laura Lovett April 9, 2018
Capturing a patient’s experience outside the doctor’s office has been an ongoing struggle when it comes to treating Parkinson’s disease. But now a new smartphone app can now detect the severity of symptoms in patients with Parkinson’s disease remotely, according to a recent study published by JAMA.  Researchers at Johns Hopkins University, the University of Rochester Medical Center and Aston...
By Laura Lovett March 8, 2018
A recent Johns Hopkins study found that prediabetic patients who used the interactive mobile coaching program Sweetch lost weight and increased physical activity.   The study, published in JMIR, found that participant lost a mean 3.5 pounds and significantly improved weekly physical activity over the course of the three-month trial. Participants also saw a decrease in HBa1C or glycated hemoglobin...
By Jonah Comstock February 27, 2017
EpiWatch, the Apple Watch-based ResearchKit study on epilepsy led by Johns Hopkins, shared some early results at a conference last week. The results shared were of 598 participants over 10 months who used the app to track their seizures and provided information to researchers about what was happening before the seizure struck. The most common trigger, named in 37 percent of cases, was stress....
By Aditi Pai December 16, 2015
Pairing contextual texts and activity tracking leads to people moving more, according to a small study of 48 outpatients of an academic CVD prevention center in Baltimore, Maryland that was published in the Journal of the American Heart Association. The study, which was conducted in three phases, looked into whether activity tracking and texting interventions among smartphone users aged 18 to 69...
By Aditi Pai October 28, 2015
Researchers from Johns Hopkins Department of Neurology and Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Department of Neurosurgery have developed an app for the Hydrocephalus Association, called HydroAssist. People with hydrocephalus, which is a condition caused by an abnormal accumulation of cerebrospinal fluid in the brain, can use the app, available on iOS and Android smartphones and tablets...
By MHN Staff October 15, 2015
By the MobiHealthNews team This morning a number of big name medical institutions launched new studies using Apple's ResearchKit, iPhones and, in at least one case, the Apple Watch. As more ResearchKit study apps become available on Apple's app store, it appears that many of them are laying the groundwork for future FDA-cleared medical apps. It not only seems to be the case, the medical...
By Jonah Comstock September 3, 2015
Johns Hopkins University is preparing to launch the first Apple ResearchKit study to incorporate the Apple Watch as a data collection device, according to a report from Apple Insider. Johns Hopkins declined to comment at this time. The study will be designed to help Johns Hopkins researchers learn more about epilepsy, according to the report. Johns Hopkins will work with Thread Research, who also...
By Jonah Comstock March 17, 2015
The Project Emerge app at Johns Hopkins. As hospitals bring remote patient monitoring and connected apps into their intensive care units, they're finding opportunities to not just increase efficiency of care, but also to improve the experience of being in or of having a family member in the ICU, according to a new report in the Wall Street Journal. The WSJ article focuses on three different...