MIT

By Jonah Comstock December 2, 2015
What if wearables like Fitbits and the Apple Watch represent the infancy of on-body health sensors, something we'll one day look back on the way we now look at the clunky, boxy mobile phones of the 1980s? A number of researchers are working on ultrathin, flexible sensors that could be applied to the skin like smart tattoos, or even applied to the surface of organs inside the body to continually...
By Jonah Comstock September 1, 2015
Pictured above: A device from Cambridge-based MC10, a company focused on flexible electronics. The US Department of Defense is making a big bet on flexible electronics, an area of technology with close ties to mobile health. The DoD announced last week that it will invest $75 million in a public-private partnership called the Manufacturing Innovation Institute for Flexible Hybrid Electronics,...
By Jonah Comstock August 10, 2015
As his time in office draws to a close, President Obama secured his reputation as our first geek president by hosting a tech startup demo day in the White House last week. Although the primary purpose of the demo day was to showcase diversity in tech entrepreneurship, a number of mobile health and wellness-focused companies filled out the ranks of Obama's invited startups. Here's a round-up of...
By Jonah Comstock June 24, 2015
Participants in MIT's 2014 Hackathon with MGH and Samsung. MIT's Hacking Medicine program, which has organized medical hackathons since 2011, has launched a new spin-off: the Hacking Medicine Institute, a 501c3 nonprofit with a slightly different mission. The new organization will assess whether digital health products and services really work and, if they do, help them to prove their efficacy...
By Jonah Comstock November 4, 2014
Andrew Conrad, the Google X researcher heading up the company's recently-announced ingestible-wearable sensor platform, has shared a good deal more information about the project in an interview with BackChannel. He said he believes the project is only a few years away from viability. Conrad said that Google has hired more than 100 people to work on the project and is working with MIT and Stanford...
By Jonah Comstock February 24, 2014
An ear-worn heart monitor, from Quanttus co-founder David He's MIT thesis. Cambridge, Massachusetts-based Quanttus, a stealthy MIT startup working on wearable vital sign monitoring, has raised $19 million in first round funding from Khosla Ventures and Matrix Partners. The company has previously raised $3 million in seed funds from Vinod Khosla. “Quanttus is pushing monitoring into many high...
By Aditi Pai October 9, 2013
Jonathan Bush, CEO and cofounder of athenahealth, wants to build a healthcare internet. Bush spoke about the barriers to healthcare innovation in a lively conversation with MIT Technology Review Editor in Chief Jason Pontin at the EmTech event in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Bush described athenahealth, provider of cloud-based EHR and practice management software, as the "water boy" for the health...
By Aditi Pai September 25, 2013
MIT's Little Devices Lab announced a new initiative to support innovation for nurses at New York's 2013 World Maker Faire last week. Little Devices Lab, which develops technologies for the healthcare environment, and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation launched a six month initiative, MakerNurse, to travel the country and talk to nurses in order to learn what technologies and systems nurses use...
By Jonah Comstock May 29, 2013
Damon Centola When it comes to public health, the conventional wisdom about how best to spread information on social networks might need to be turned on its head, according to a recently published paper by Professor Damon Centola of the MIT Sloan School of Management, entitled "Social Media and the Science of Health Behavior." "If you really want people to change their diet, their health, their...
By Jonah Comstock March 18, 2013
Fujitsu announced the development of a technology, to be presented soon at the 2013 General Conference of the Institute of Electronics, Information, and Communication Engineers in Gifu, Japan, that detects a person's pulse using a smartphone or PC's built-in camera. The announcement generated a lot of buzz in technology publications. If this sounds familiar to MobiHealthNews readers, it's because...