mobile health efficacy study

By Jonah Comstock 09:56 am November 18, 2013
A study of a text messaging intervention for low-income patients with Type 2 diabetes showed a statistically significant affect on medication adherence and emergency room visits, but not HbA1c hemoglobin levels. It also showed that the texting intervention was more effective for Spanish speakers than English speakers. The study of 128 patients, published in the Annals of Emergency Medicine, was...
By Neil Versel 09:45 am July 16, 2013
Dr. Robert Kaplan The research community appears to be relishing the challenge of producing enough scientific evidence to prove or disprove the efficacy of mobile health technologies while also remaining open to new methods of evaluation that can keep pace with rapid innovation. "The literature has really mushroomed in the last couple of years," Robert M. Kaplan, director of the Office of...
By Jonah Comstock 01:07 pm May 20, 2013
A small validation study in Sweden suggests that teledermatology, conducted using an iPhone, a dedicated app, and a connected dermascope, can be roughly as effective as a face-to-face dermatology consultation. The study of 69 lesions (the number of patients is not specified) was conducted at Sahlgrenska University Hospital in Sweden and published in the journal Dermatology Practical and...
By Jonah Comstock 01:13 pm April 2, 2013
A new study from the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, published in the journal Obstetrics and Gynecology, found that text messaging was ineffective at changing the minds of pregnant women who were not intending to get the influenza vaccine. In their study of 158 urban, low-income pregnant women, researchers found that text messages had no effect on whether expectant mothers got the...
By Neil Versel 04:00 am September 25, 2012
Getting people to embrace motivational gaming for health and fitness may be a struggle, but some new data suggest that the concept works well when used properly. Results of a study presented Sunday at the annual meeting of the Obesity Society in San Antonio, Texas, found that 59 percent of adolescents using Zamzee, an activity meter that resembles a USB drive, had higher levels of physical...