Nature

By Dave Muoio August 28, 2018
Pivotal trial data that led to April’s de novo clearance of the first AI-based diagnostic system to not require clinician interpretation is now available to the public. Published today in npj Digital Medicine, this 900-patient investigation showed that the IDx-Dr system for autonomous detection of diabetic retinopathy “robustly exceeded the pre-specified primary endpoint goals” and is able to...
fitbit study for patient health outcomes
By Jonah Comstock July 10, 2018
Wearable activity monitors could be useful in assessing the health of cancer patients and making predictions about mortality and adverse events, according to a study published last week in Nature's Digital Medicine partner journal. "An objective evaluation of patient performance status (PS) is difficult because patients spend the majority of their time outside of the clinic, self-report to...
By Jonah Comstock May 9, 2018
A new overview of systematic reviews of published randomized control trials of mobile health apps found just 23 RCTs of currently-available apps have been conducted, and less than half of those showed a positive health effect from the app in question. A group of researchers from the Centre for Research in Evidence-Based Practice at Bond University in Queensland, Australia conducted the review,...
By Jeff Lagasse July 19, 2017
On-skin sensors that monitor vital signs can often cause inflammation, but that may be about to change. According to a new study in Nature Nanotechnology, a new approach to this technology using a nanomesh structure could have positive implications for long-term health monitoring.   The new sensors are inflammation-free, are very gas permeable, and they’re thin and lightweight, without the use of...
By Jonah Comstock January 27, 2016
Researchers at Stanford University and the University of California-Berkeley have built a prototype that could lead to a slew of new features for wearable activity trackers. The group, led by principal investigator Ali Javey, a professor at UC-Berkeley, have created a wearable sensor that can continuously collect and monitor users’ sweat on the molecular level, then sends the information via...
By Jonah Comstock January 19, 2016
Researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign are developing tiny sensors that can monitor temperature and pressure within the skull and then dissolve harmlessly into the cranial fluid. When fully developed, these devices could present a new, safer method for monitoring patients after brain surgery or a traumatic brain injury. “The ultimate strategy is to have a device that you...
By Jonah Comstock January 23, 2014
Israeli neuroscience technology company GlassesOff has announced its first iPad app, just a month after the company launched its iOS app for iPhones and iPods. The apps help users eliminate dependency on reading glasses by "enhancing the image processing function in the visual cortex of the brain," according to the company. Within the app, users can play intensive visual stimulation games...
By Jonah Comstock September 15, 2013
Flexible electronic sensors, worn like temporary tattoos on the skin, could be used to detect everything from blood flow to cognitive function, according to a new study published in Nature Materials, led by John Rogers, who is also the cofounder of wearable sensor company MC10. Rogers, a University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign professor who has been working on flexible electronic sensors for...
By Jonah Comstock September 4, 2013
A study participant playing Neuroracer. A new study from the University of California, San Francisco shows that a specially designed mobile video game could improve neural plasticity in older adults, improving their ability to multitask and to filter out distractions. A spin-off company is currently testing a version of the game for the possible treatment of ADHD, depression, or autism...