New England Journal of Medicine

By Jonah Comstock April 19, 2018
A recently published study in the New England Journal of Medicine shows that 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring is a better predictor of cardiovascular and all-cause mortality than just monitoring blood pressure in the clinic. While the results may not be surprising, they are important validation for the growing field of remote patient monitoring, which generally holds that monitoring...
By Jonah Comstock January 16, 2018
Connected thermometers track flu season. Smart thermometer company Kinsa told the New York Times that its flu tracking data is more accurate and more granular than that of the CDC. Kinsa's data -- based on 25,000 readings a day from thermometers in 500,000 households around the country -- suggests that California's flu outbreak is the worst in five years, while the Northeast, including New York...
By Jonah Comstock January 26, 2016
A number of public and private initiatives have been launched over the years in the name of a personal health record for patients. But one way or another, they've all failed to gain traction, according to Drs. Isaac Kohane and Kenneth Mandl of the Harvard-affiliated Boston Children's Hospital, who published an editorial in the New England Journal of Medicine last week. The authors believe now...
By Jonah Comstock June 16, 2014
The Dexcom G4 was the continuous glucose monitor used in the study. An artificial pancreas system -- consisting of a continuous glucose monitor, and insulin pump, and an iPhone 4s -- has been shown to improve glucose regulation in a simulated outpatient setting in both adults and adolescents with Type 1 diabetes, according to a new paper in the New England Journal of Medicine. The adult...