Northwestern University

By Dave Muoio April 25, 2018
A study published yesterday in JAMA found that, compared to normal care, a home-based exercise program employing wearables and telephone coaching did not help patients with peripheral artery disease (PAD) improve their walking performance over a nine-month period. In fact, those undergoing the interventional program reported increased pain compared to those undergoing normal care. Blood vessel...
By Dave Muoio March 20, 2018
Gatorade’s efforts to conquer dehydration have again entered the digital realm. Twice reports that the sports drink company and Northwestern University have developed a low-cost wearable skin patch that displays various colors to conveniently let the wearer know when they need to take a drink. The patches were developed and introduced in 2016 by Northwestern University McCormick School of...
By Dave Muoio February 19, 2018
A connected sensor patch developed by Northwestern University engineers and the Shirley Ryan AbilityLab, a research hospital in Chicago, could allow clinicians to better monitor stroke patients as they recover at home. The sensor is comprised of stretchable electronic technology that is both comfortable for patients to wear and accurate enough for use during rehabilitation, according to...
By Heather Mack September 29, 2016
Beginning this fall, Aetna will combine Apple’s consumer tech offerings with its analytics-based wellness and care management programs by integrating several iOS-exclusive health initiatives. First off, the company will make the Apple Watch available to some of its large employers and individual members during open enrollment season, and will be subsidizing part of the cost. Aetna will also be...
By Jonah Comstock September 16, 2016
There are two pieces to making apps for mental health that work, according to David Mohr, director of the Center for Behavioral Intervention Technologies at Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine: a human element and making the app as low-touch as possible. At the HIMSS Pop Health Forum in Chicago this week, Mohr shared data from a number of studies to demonstrate his point. He...
By Jonah Comstock June 23, 2015
What constitutes a successful patient portal? Is it enough that patients engage with the portal, or do they actually need to demonstrate that they've learned new information from it? These are questions hospitals are grappling with as they seek to deploy patient portals and meet Meaningful Use guidelines. One study, recently published in the Journal of the American Medical Informatics Society,...
By Aditi Pai February 3, 2015
Researchers from Northwestern University have launched a study that will analyze how monitoring the physical activity of patients who underwent spine surgery, using Fitbit activity trackers, could help them predict the patient's recovery time. Mayo Clinic published results of a similar study that used Fitbit devices to track recovery time of cardiac patients back in 2013. Northwestern is ...
By Jonah Comstock April 9, 2014
Researchers at University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and Northwestern University are continuing to iterate in the field of stretchable, flexible sensors and antennae. A new paper, recently published in Science, presented a new approach to the category that would allow off-the-shelf chip-based electronics to be incorporated into a peel-and-stick patch. “We designed this device to monitor...
By Jonah Comstock September 15, 2013
Flexible electronic sensors, worn like temporary tattoos on the skin, could be used to detect everything from blood flow to cognitive function, according to a new study published in Nature Materials, led by John Rogers, who is also the cofounder of wearable sensor company MC10. Rogers, a University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign professor who has been working on flexible electronic sensors for...
By Jonah Comstock February 27, 2013
The smart handle from Fraunhofer. Surgeons learn to conduct all sorts of mind-bogglingly complex procedures within our bodies, whether it's installing and adjusting medical devices, removing or ablating tumors, or conducting precise surgery on organs as small as our eyes. Surgeons do incredible work with their hands and manual tools, but a new generation of smart surgical tools, incorporating...