tuberculosis

By Dave Muoio 03:18 pm October 7, 2019
Proteus Digital Health’s ingestible pill and sensor system could improve medication adherence, and subsequently treatment, for patients with tuberculosis (TB), according to new data from an independent study conducted in California. Published Friday in PLoS Medicine, the trial found Proteus’ system to accurately determine whether or not a medication was taken. Patients using the system at home...
By Dave Muoio 03:20 pm April 27, 2018
Replacing the frequent home visits often necessary for tuberculosis treatment with video visits facilitated by an app appears to be a cost-effective, well-received means of ensuring adherence throughout therapy, according to a recently published pilot study. Because TB is, airborne, highly infectious, and increasingly resistant to antibiotics, treatment and prevention of the disease often...
By Aditi Pai 09:21 am November 3, 2014
Health app developer emocha, which stands for electronic mobile comprehensive health application, has partnered with the Baltimore City Health Department to run a pilot on medication adherence for patients with tuberculosis. The Baltimore City Health Department will use emocha's app, miDOT, which stands for mobile indirect observational therapy, in the pilot. The miDOT app will record videos of...
By Brian Dolan 03:47 am January 12, 2010
Pharmaceutical giant Novartis announced that would invest $24M in upfront cash and equity as part of an exclusive worldwide agreement for the pharma company to license Proteus Biomedical's sensing technology for organ transplantation. (That must be the kind of exclusive deal Novartis had in mind when the two companies announced their collaboration on a pilot last year.) As part of the deal,...
By Brian Dolan 05:34 am February 17, 2009
"We really see such a huge opportunity here," said Claire Thwaites, head of the Vodafone Foundation and United Nations Foundation partnership. "There are 2.2 billion mobile phones in emerging markets and such a low number of PCs [only 305 million]. The number of healthcare workers and hospital beds are very, very low too. Mobile networks, of course, can be deployed much more easily than can fixed...