University of Washington

By Laura Lovett February 19, 2018
A new elastic electrode sensor paired with a wireless communication module can noninvasively monitor a patient’s biometric data and send it to a doctor via the cloud. The technology also allows for the monitoring to be displayed on the patient’s body — for example, electrocardiogram waves can visually appear on the transparent wearable in real-time.  It may sound — and look — like something...
By Jonah Comstock August 29, 2017
University of Washington app aims to detect pancreatic cancer early  We wrote in 2014 about BiliCam, an app being developed at the University of Washington to detect jaundice in newborn babies. Now the same team has created BiliScreen, focusing on using the same technology in adults, for whom jaundice can be an early warning of pancreatic cancer. Because the app can detect jaundice at earlier...
By Jonah Comstock August 15, 2017
Alphabet (the Google parent company formerly known as Google) has acquired a small, Seattle-based startup called Senosis Health, according to Geekwire, which broke the story on Sunday. Senosis, which had only recently come out of stealth mode, may not be a company many have heard of, but its founder Shwetak Patel, a professor at the University of Washington and a visiting researcher at Microsoft...
By Bernie Monegain April 7, 2017
Asking patients to prepare notes ahead of a doctor visit boosts physician-patient communication and efficiency, according to new research from the University of Washington School of Medicine. The researchers asked patients at the Adult Medicine Clinic at Harborview Medical Center in Seattle to type what they wanted to discuss with the doctor into their medical records using computers in the...
By Bernie Monegain January 30, 2017
Seattle-based KenSci has raised $8.5 million in its first round of funding. It plans to use the capital to further develop its data and machine learning platform and expand its operations. The company, which was incubated at the University of Washington in Tacoma, boasts a rapidly growing customer base. KenSci spun out in 2015 after more than four years of research and industry-academic...
By Heather Mack September 7, 2016
Researchers at the University of Washington are working on a sensor-enabled smartphone app that could possibly detect anemia, the MIT Technology Review reports. While the technology is in relatively early stages and questions remain about its accuracy up against conventional blood tests, researchers believe it holds promise as a non-invasive tool in places where there are large populations of...
By Jonah Comstock May 4, 2016
A research team from the University of Washington has adapted a smartphone-based spirometry test to work with any kind of phone, including feature phones and landline phones, and to deliver clinically accurate results.  Back in 2012, the University developed a smartphone app, SpiroSmart, that would use the measure lung function using the phone's microphone. But in attempting to put the device to...
By Aditi Pai November 20, 2015
The University of Washington and RightAnswer, a chemical information management service, have received a $150,000 Small Business Innovation and Research grant from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to develop and launch an app that helps healthcare providers access data about the risks of taking drugs while pregnant. According to the university, each year 40,000 infants are born with...
By Aditi Pai April 28, 2015
The University of Washington (UW) has developed an app that helps detect sleep apnea, called ApneaApp. App development was funded by the National Science Foundation and the University of Washington. UW said that usually, to diagnose sleep apnea, providers need to use sensors attached to the user's body and special equipment, but ApneaApp can detect sleep apnea using inaudible sound waves...
By Brian Dolan August 28, 2014
Medical and engineering researchers at the University of Washington in Seattle have developed a smartphone app, called BiliCam, that they claim can diagnose jaundice in newborns via a smartphone's camera. "The app, called BiliCam, uses a smartphone’s camera and flash and a color calibration card the size of a business card," a blog post on the university's site explains. "A parent or health care...