Wikipedia

By Jonah Comstock 10:20 am June 18, 2014
The FDA has, at long last, released draft guidance for how pharmaceutical companies should behave on limited-character social media platforms like Twitter and when correcting misinformation on third-party sites. The FDA carefully controls labeling, advertisement, and promotion for drugs and devices requiring FDA clearance. It makes sure that companies never list the benefits of a drug without...
By Jonah Comstock 09:50 am May 28, 2014
According to a new study, Wikipedia's medical articles contain numerous errors, or at least don't line up with up-to-date, peer-reviewed journals. In fact, nine out of 10 of the diseases identified as most costly for the healthcare system by the Agency for Healthcare Reform and Quality (AHRQ) had a statistically significant discrepancy between the two. In the study, published in The Journal of...
By Aditi Pai 07:50 am April 24, 2014
Almost 90 percent of Americans say they would make their personal health data available to researchers to help them better understand a disease or to improve care and treatment options, according to a survey of 1,001 Americans over the age of 18 conducted by research firm Kelton and healthcare communications firm Makovsky Health. Within this group, 26 percent of consumers would share regardless...
By Jonah Comstock 03:35 am January 21, 2014
A new report from IMS Health on the use of social media by pharmaceutical companies finds that among the top 50 pharmaceutical companies, half don't engage with consumers and patients through social media. But of those that do, IMS found that Johnson & Johnson emerged as a clear leader. It scored a 70 on IMS's Social Media Engagement Index. The next highest score, from GlaxoSmithkline, was...